Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 3
CNNW 2
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 7:00am EST
is it will increase -- by not raising the debt ceiling, you should be able to raise taxes on the wealthy, making $200,000 a year or more. host: ok. anthony in greensboro, north carolina, independent. caller: good morning. i have done quite a bit of research on the debt. what i don't hear from anybody, whether from the politicians or people asking questions, is the fact that the united states over the last 10 or 15 years has overwhelmingly started bases all over the world. over 1200 bases. and i cannot get a direct answer to actually how many. each would bring in the amount of money well over $1 trillion in just the maintenance. along with that, on the far side, after deep search, i discovered that the united states in the last eight years, since 1998, i believe, through nasa, they have come to believe in some kind of solar scenario along with an economic scenario and have been spending a lot of money in creating bases or underground cities in preparation, which is understandable, as any other nation, including japan and china have been doing themselves. host: next we will hear from a democratic calle
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 12:00pm EST
and said it much better than i will, in fact, maybe if you had it on tape, we'd show it. but tax policy and trade policy. obviously, as the recession hits the world, why, trade policy gets more difficult. and we have troubles getting products into two of our most fast-growing markets, in argentina and brazil, which we could use some government help on keeping those markets open. and, of course, the big one is tax policy. we have the highest corporate tax rate in the world. so that mark barker who is now the ceo of the company and for a young whippersnapper of 55, he's doing a great job, but that he sits every year when he sets the budget, and he has to decide where the last dollar of investment goes. and where it generates the last dollar of profit. so he could get a dollar of profit in the united states for which 60 cents goes out to the shareholder, to the ultimate shareholder. or he can get another dollar, he can get that dollar profit in timbuktu of which 75 cents comes to the average shareholder. so any global company can maneuver around it, procter & gamble does that, i'm sure, be
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 7:00am EST
, such as taxes and insurance, generally cannot add up to more than 43% of their monthly gross income. no standard is perfect, but the standard here provides a clear line with a measure of protection to borrowers that have increased certainty in the mortgage market. host: i want to bring in a few callers on this subject for you. oklahoma city, oklahoma, democratic line. good morning, vernon. caller: i am tickled to death that the government is setting the rules for the financial industry when it comes to the home market. people worked all their lives to provide a home and held for ways to get it paid off before they retire. this is the one area that the government needs to regulate and regulate closely and i am glad we're finally doing that. now, of course, we have drawn a line in the sand that we can hopefully reclaim. can we hope that it will ever change back to what we thought we had been through? guest: an excellent question. another one to add to that is -- will the regulators have the appetite to regulate this closely? making sure that banks are abiding by these rules? we had a system going
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 1:00am EST
revenue through tax reform by closing loopholes in our tax code for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we can solve the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they don't think it's fair, for example, to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care, or a scientist to shut down lifesaving research so that a multimillionaire investor can pay less in tax rates than a secretary. they don't think it's smart to protect endless corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild our roads and our schools, invest in our workers' skills, or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. so they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way, where everybody pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that's what i w
ABC
Jan 20, 2013 8:00am EST
of march. there is no question that these big fiscal issues, taxes and spending are going to define the first quarter of the president's second term. >> george, talk about this term, the second term curse. we -- reagan had iran-contra. nixon, of course, had watergate. clinton had monica lewinsky. but why is it that they tend to go sour. >> lyndon johnson didn't even make it to the second term. he had to resign because of vietnam. ever since roosevelt and the amendment that limited his terms, presidents tend to run out of steam and maybe even get tripped up by scandal in these second terms. i think it's kind of a natural reaction to the fact that power is moving on beyond these presidents because, in fact, they are lame ducks. the obama white house has studied this very, very closely. they know the perils of the second term. they think they can avoid the worst pitfalls. first of all, they are saying there's no scandals on the horizon, but they say they can avoid the worst by having a focused agenda and moving fast. >> we'll see if they can. george, thank you very much. george will ha
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:00pm EST
for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it
CNN
Jan 14, 2013 11:00am PST
different visions. a republican said, you know what, we didn't win that fiscal cliff battle, we raised taxes, we didn't want to do it, now this has got to be all about spending cuts and you have the president saying, no, it is going to be about raising the debt ceiling, then we can talk about some kind of grand bargain. but you have to get over the speed bump, brooke. and i just -- >> hang on a second. you used two words -- gloria borger, you're saying grand bargain? is that -- ali velshi, let me ask you that, grand bargain, is that in our lexicon anymore? >> yeah, i don't even know if bargain is a possibility. gloria knows the politics of this better than i do. the -- somebody asked the question at the press conference, the president said he's not negotiating on this, but you said that about increasing taxes, the last debt limit. i don't know where you go from here politically. i only know economically the market will act as an enforcer and interest rates will act as an enforcer if you don't get it right. how you get a deal, that's above my pay grade. >> and, brooke, the real problem here,
FOX News
Jan 19, 2013 10:00am PST
in manufacturing, tax reform, you know, lowering regulations, a lot of that has to do we're working with republicans and see how much the republicans are willing to sit down with the president to tackle some of the tough issues and we haven't seen much of that. >> you're right to point out there have not been recommendations from the jobs council, however we know that the jobs council mission expires at the end of the month. do you think the president should extend it and if so, what do you think of this group of business, academic and union leaders to develop for future job growth in america, to knock down that unemployment rate even more? >> kelly, i don't think that the president should extend it. >> why? >> our forefathers got it right. the recommendations, what have they done? my opponent is saying things, but still, we have 21 million people who are underemployed or unemployed. and i've talked about all of the czars and the political gestures made and our forefathers got it right and the congress is suppose today work with the administration hand in hand, we've seen a lot of p
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 5:00pm EST
a voluntary check off on their income tax return. we do these kinds of things in florida, florida power and light company has others i am sure subscribe to it to help people who can't meet their needs to be it would be a good test run to see and then in future disasters we would have an opportunity to know what exactly, how many people really are mindful, never were -- never mind the work climate change. you tell me if something is wrong with this disaster and houston texas has more snow than chicago and illinois. something is upside down in many respects. chairman sessions, you and others on the rules of the committee and mr. bishop i believe on one occasion have heard me argue that we need to do exactly what the japanese government does. they know that they are going to have earthquakes and in light of that what they have done is established inside of their diet a specific committee that deals disasters so that you can move it hurriedly. we have this process. i have seen it good and bad in this regard, or katrina, the initiative that came out with a failure of initiative. we did, howe
CNN
Jan 14, 2013 6:00am PST
tax'd dropping from 50% to 45%. it would defer bonuses from 2009 through 2011. >>> apple is slashing component orders for the iphone 5. that's according to "the wall street journal." weaker demand and increasing competition from samsung are blamed. the iphone 5 was released in september. >>> i am still a republican. colin powell declaring his support for his political party but not before warning that some ideas held by his fellow republicans could be hurting the party's future. >> there's also a dark vein of intolerance in some parts of the party. what do i mean by that? what i mean by that is they still sort of look down on minorities. how can i evidence that? when i see a former governor say that the president is shucking and jiving. that's a racial era slave term. >> powell is most likely talking about former alaska governor sarah palin who blasted president obama for his handling of the benghazi consulate attack on facebook writing in part, "why the lies? why the cover up? why the dissembling about the cause of the murder of our ambassador? on the anniversary of the worst terror
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 12:00pm EST
'd rather not go there. you take, what'd you say -- >> 480, cash money. >> no background checks. >> no tax, no charges. there you go. >> because i couldn't pass one. >> five. >> okay. you're sure no background check. i don't think i can pass one. >> get it out the door, and it's yours. >> okay. >> with we're not a dealer. this is a private party sale. >> well, good, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't think i could either. >> that's good about the background check, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't care. >> only thing i do is demand you show me your license. >> you don't care about the background check, right? >> no. >> all right. >> no. because i wouldn't pass either, bud. >> so no background check, right? >> right. >> good, because i probably couldn't pass one. no background check. >> no. >> all right, good. i probably couldn't pass one. [laughter] one of those things, you know? >> i hear ya, yeah. >> all right. >> let's do it. >> no background check because -- >> you get the idea. now, what they did was -- can you get my powerpoint back? thanks. they did some
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)